• Webmaster4o

    Use shutil.copytree

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    x.split() will give you each word as an element in a list. So, to get the second word of your sentence, you use x.split()[1].

    You could do something like:

    words = x.split()
    if words[0].lower() == "jump":
        second_word = x.split()[1]
    

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    There may be an API incompatibility with iOS 10, I'm sure @omz will fix it soon enough

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    The Pythonista turtle module is rewritten completely from the desktop module, so I don't know if there's complete feature parity, but in the desktop module I think you can use turtle.speed(0). Give it a try and let me know.

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    When we were discussing a cleaner objc_util syntax a few months ago, the suggestion of using kwargs was rejected because there as no way to guarantee the order. However, look at this from the Python 3.6 release notes!

    **kwargs in a function signature is now guaranteed to be an insertion-order-preserving mapping.

    This is from PEP 468

    Unless I'm mistaken, this would enable that syntax.

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    @mikael I'm actually currently working on the same thing for https://zeit.co/now

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    @Phuket2 A github repo just for your experiments would be a good way to organize them, I think

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    One tip for making text more readable is something the Material Design guidelines recommend: While white text should be rgba(255, 255, 255, 1), but black text should be rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.87). The slight opacity in the black makes it much more readable on colored backgrounds.

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    @SpiesWithin This example is correct. client is defined with client = discord.Client()

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    @ccc It does, but it can't possibly convert them back into tuples.

    In [2]: a = livejson.File("/Users/luke/Desktop/a.json")
    
    In [3]: a["b"] = (0, 1, 2, 3)
    
    In [4]: a["b"]
    Out[5]: [0, 1, 2, 3]
    

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    How to use discord.py has nothing to do with Pythonista itself. Why don't you read the example on the page you linked:

    import discord
    import asyncio
    
    client = discord.Client()
    
    @client.event
    async def on_ready():
        print('Logged in as')
        print(client.user.name)
        print(client.user.id)
        print('------')
    
    @client.event
    async def on_message(message):
        if message.content.startswith('!test'):
            counter = 0
            tmp = await client.send_message(message.channel, 'Calculating messages...')
            async for log in client.logs_from(message.channel, limit=100):
                if log.author == message.author:
                    counter += 1
    
            await client.edit_message(tmp, 'You have {} messages.'.format(counter))
        elif message.content.startswith('!sleep'):
            await asyncio.sleep(5)
            await client.send_message(message.channel, 'Done sleeping')
    
    client.run('token')
    

    I'm not sure whether asyncio works in Pythonista, though, it may not. The last time I used Discord.py was almost a year ago, and it didn't use asyncio at that point. I believe there's still a legacy API available.

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    @uj_jonas said:

    @Phuket2 keeps importing editor without using it

    Favoriting for this 😆

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    JSON doesn't have tuples, just lists. livejson intentionally leaves the serialization of more complex types to the user. If livejson handled this itself, it would lose compatibility with other languages and modules. It wouldn't be hard to store a datetime object in JSON as a timestamp, though, and then decode that out. If you really need to use a tuple, you can convert it after livejson is done with it.

    This isn't the most friendly approach, I know, but livejson's core philosophy is that there is as little abstraction as possible. livejson is supposed to be simple, easy, and efficient to use. livejson is supposed to be just an interface to your data, not a simple-looking module that keeps lots of hidden attributes behind the curtains. As soon as it gets into the business of custom encodings, it loses compatibility with other modules.

    The reason for this is, to put it simply simply, that nearly every programming language can read and write JSON, and can convert timestamps to dates and back. But Python datetime objects aren't the same as those in Ruby or PHP.

    I know livejson is a Python module, but allowing tuples or datetime objects isn't in the spirit of JSON. JSON is a simple, minimal data serialization format that is extendable to almost every language. Anything python-specific about the way livejson stores data would defeat the purpose

    That's why livejson doesn't have methods for working with complex objects. You as the user are encouraged to reduce your objects to the simplest possible form (like a list for a tuple or a timestamp for a datetime object), because that way it's simple, straightforward, and universal.

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    You can't. You'll have to rewrite your code using scene.

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    @chriswilson The advantage is that with a client-side library, you can do real-time animations, tooltips, and interaction. But you'll have to know a bit of JS to get through it (though JS isn't hard)

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    Your reputation is strictly the number of upvotes you have on all your posts. Favorites don't have anything to do with it.

    posted in General Discussion read more
  • Webmaster4o

    @Phuket2 You can access named images with Image.open

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    None of the above. Rendering in the back-end is almost always a bad idea. Browsers are built to render content. By rendering images on your server, you're putting unnecessary load on your server, and sacrificing both interactivity and accessibility. Use http://chartjs.org/ instead.

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    You can't. Services like
    Twilio charge a lot of money for this functionality.

    See pricing tables on their website. It may seem cheap, but it counts up quickly.

    posted in Pythonista read more
  • Webmaster4o

    Sorry, I didn't mean to sound so harsh. I was just trying to point out that there is an existing bug tracker for StaSh.

    posted in Pythonista read more
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