• Ti Leyon

    Yes I know but adapting a Pygame project to the Pytonista environment deserves as much respect. I can run Tauber’s code in Android, being able to do so in IOS is a double treat.

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  • Ti Leyon

    Ok @JonB I understand. Just being able to emulate an Apple ii using Python on an iPhone or iPad is an extraordinary feat in itself. Chapeau bas (respect).

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  • Ti Leyon

    @JonB I think it is an excellent idea to improve on "Applepy". I am currently investigating the interest of big IT (can't live without them) in RSA factorization. I found a quadratic sequence that can solve it in polynomial time. Therefore, I cannot entertain any project of that scale for now. I will probably try something simple (I think) that will take a couple hours (I think) like "Chip-8" or a "p-machine" a la Pascal. By the way, doesn't "Scene" implement some kind of frame buffer? I never really use it mainly because it will be costly (time wise) to build cross platform applications using it. I know most (if not all) of these type of environment implement screen buffering. Below is a screen shot of "iDOS 2" running "windows 3.11" on an iPad mini 4. It is smoother or as smooth as other "DOSBox" implementations I have used. It uses the screen area as a mousepad that is ultra responsive. Games and animations run as well as in the original 3.11 on the best computers of that era. I do not think the dev could have done it without screen buffering and switching. In case "Scene" does not offer screen buffering, could sprites the size of the screen area be used for this purpose? Anyway, it would be swell to have "Applepy" run on a skeuomorphic skin as does "iDOS". Am I dreaming aloud?
    iDos Screenshot

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  • Ti Leyon

    I am very much into emulators although not of the video game kind. @JonB either wrote or forked a Python Apple ][ emulator that depends on Pygame. If he did not port it into Pythonista it is probably because this is very (if not extremely) hard. In fact, I saw him talk about that level of difficulty in a few posts in this forum. Anyway, if you want to experiment with emulation on IOS you should try “iDOS 2”. It masquerades as a collection of old video games but is in fact a full DOSBox emulator. If you can penetrate its sandbox (which is not that hard) you can run any DOS program you want including MS Windows 3.xx. You should check out “https://www.vogons.org/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=56790” which is a fairly good discussion of emulation under DOS and Windows 3.xx. It contains a few links to NES emulators for DOS and Windows 3.xx that you can “MOD” if you are into this kind of stuff (and can spare the time for it). I do not know how fast they will run under iDOS. However, I run Windows 3.11 from iDOS on a 2015 iPad mini at similar speed as on the typical 66 MHz computers of its time. If you are part of the crazy “update at all cost” crowd you are out of luck. “iDOS 2” has not been updated in a few years and it has no forum for endless whinnies. However, it works fine and is surprisingly stable. If you want to install Windows 3.xx I would suggest a “MOD” version that runs from a folder instead of a virtual drive. You may find it somewhere in the “vogons” site from the link above. Happy emulating!

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  • Ti Leyon

    @timtim If you can wait forever for Apple to upgrade your device you may as well use Pythonista as it is and make the best of it.

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  • Ti Leyon

    As mentioned above, SAAS and the cloud have become a major source of income for big IT. According to Gartner Inc, “Software as a service (SaaS) remains the largest segment of the cloud market, with revenue expected to grow 17.8 percent to reach $85.1 billion in 2019.”
    Ref.: https://www.gartner.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2018-09-12-gartner-forecasts-worldwide-public-cloud-revenue-to-grow-17-percent-in-2019

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  • Ti Leyon

    Will Apple pay you back for your IOS device that has an unfixable flaw? No No No No No. What are you going to do about it?
    Ref.: https://www.theverge.com/2019/9/27/20886835/iphone-exploit-checkm8-axi0mx-security-flaw-vunerability-jailbreak-permanent-bootrom-ios

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  • Ti Leyon

    Kudos to you @cvp for what sounds like a rewarding career. May these memories live with us for ever. I relive them from time to time through a collection emulators and virtual machines. I run the emulators in my mobile devices and it is unfortunate that Apple restrict their use on IOS. I was pleasantly surprise to find a port of an Apple II emulator in this forum. It was written by @JonB and I was able to poke a few 6502 opcodes. I am still amaze at all that was accomplished using the 56 instructions set of that chip.

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  • Ti Leyon

    I do not know when and how it started. Probably when the internet evolved into a commodity. Up to that point, updates came on floppy disks then on CDs whenever a vendor decided. Decent applications, including compilers, cost hundreds of dollars and users had to pay for new versions. Pryor to this, updating was a foreign concept. You had to manage what you had to get the results you needed. Sometimes, that meant "poking" machine instructions strait into the bare metal and read memory dumps just like you do with modern high level source codes. Always on internet standards provided vendors and hackers alike a free ride into your machines. Companies now had the perfect excuse to remotely take over your hardware under the pretense of protecting you with their "critical" updates. Users soon turned into digital junkies begging to get faster and faster updates. With the advent of mobile devices early developers fixed the price of quality programs at under ten dollars. This is probably due to the false perception that mobile devices are not computers and users will not be willing to pay much more for an app. This user bonanza happened to the dismay of big IT companies facing the existential threat of losing their cash cows in the ever popular mobile echo systems. It did not take long for them to recover by introducing SAS into the mobile world. They got their addicts back and strengthen their position with another costly digital indulgence eerily baptized as "the clouds". This whole scheme had to be supported by a constant stream of often unnecessary updates and upgrades to give the paying customers the impression that they are getting value for their money. The culture of entitlement was born and users started to expect regular updates for whatever programs they are using regardless of needs. However, this expectation is unwarranted in the case of free or low cost software. Pythonista is one of them. It cost less than a fast food order. However, as it stands, it is fairly stable, strong, versatile, reasonably complete and extremely useful. If you need more, it is your duty as a programmer to use "objc" or your imaginative skills to get the results you want. Furthermore, upgrades are not always possible, practical or even desirable (I still miss skeuomorphism). The early pentium processors had an inherent bug in their FPUs. Although Intel recalled the affected chips, if you had one in your machine, you either had to bypass the problem or stop working. Incidentally, it has just transpired that there is a new "unpatchable" iPhone exploit on hundreds of millions of devices.

    https://www.theverge.com/2019/9/27/20886835/iphone-exploit-checkm8-axi0mx-security-flaw-vunerability-jailbreak-permanent-bootrom-ios.

    I am waiting for your big class action lawsuit for Apple to update your expensive devices or refund your money.

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  • Ti Leyon

    Thank you for the link @dgelessus but I just wanted to point out that in a technical environment we should probably talk about “end of support” instead of “end of life”. What about basic idea shaping @mikael? Fundamental research can be tested in any language even “dead” ones. However, Python beats them all with out of the box arbitrary length integers for certain problems. In fact I just got a breakthrough factorizing large semi-primes using Python 2. When (and if) I release its source, I will make sure to set it to be incompatible with 3.x forcing “modern” users to make corrections in every lines or use Python 2. Well @JonB you are right so we better be careful with that “dangerous” Python 2. I wonder if those, like me, who still will use it after the “end of life” deadline will turn into “ghost programmers”. Anyway, thank you all for sharing the humor.

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